Do you understand designation of “fast fashion”? … And of “slow fashion”?

The designations of “fast fashion” and “slow fashion” can be compared to “fast food” and “slow food”, in the last case, gourmet.

FAST FASHION

In recent years the consumer has reacted there buys much more by impulse than by conscience.

With the increase off supply in the fast fashion market, consumers, especially women, have made many impulse purchases of cheap closes with a reduced quality of life.
They even become pieces that do not fit their style but fashion trends and at a reduced price they end up going to the bottom of the drawer.

Have you ever wondered why these parts are so cheap?
What is the origin of the fabric?
What did it take to get to this final product?
Under what conditions will this piece be made?

Many of the big fast fashion brands produce their parts in factories in poor countries, where employees (if you can call it that) work without enough conditions or pay to live or often to survive.

Many of the articles of these companies are copies of the Tailor Designers trends, which are produced in a high stock of parts and distributed by their stores worldwide, as often this stock does not run out is stored for next year back to stores, and if not exhaust go to destruction, which generates more environmental pollution.

For such low-priced parts, the fabrics are mostly composed of polyester and other plastic components that, to be produced, waste immense water and pollute the environment.

Did you know that every time you wash synthetic clothes, they drop plastic microparticles that later follow in the water from our washing machine to the ocean?

For all this, we must increasingly adapt our minds to environmental sustainability and try to make our contribution to help the planet by being conscious consumers.

SLOW FASHION

“Slow fashion” movement reflects a conscious and sustainable consumption and preference for quality rather than quantity.

Often we have pieces of clothes in the closet that no longer serve us or we simply do not like to see them anymore, we can exchange with a friend for another piece that she does not wear and even participate in a second-hand parts exchange event.

We also have the option of transforming the piece to suit our new style.

All these actions are “slow fashion” thoughts.

In the “slow fashion” market you find pieces with more organic and natural fabrics, more environmentally friendly, a confection with quality in all its details and collections with less quantity of repetition of articles. That is, less waste.

Even in the placement of the labels or the composition of the fabric … how many times have you tried to remove the label from that piece because it “scratched the skin”, and the placement of it was of such poor quality that it made a “little hole” in the fabric?

A brand of “slow fashion” is even concerned with the fabric of the labels, so that the consumer does not need to remove them by “scratching the skin”.

CONSCIOUS CONSUMPTION

Being a conscious consumer goes through buying less clothes and buying quality and timeless pieces, made not by human machines but by dressmakers who like what they are doing and who do it to perfection. It is to analyze the label of the composition of a fabric to verify the environmental wear, both in its production as in the washing and conservation of the piece. It is going to an event, going to work or just walking down the street without running the risk of finding several people with the same piece, bought in the same fast fashion store and made by the same cheap, often child labor.

Fast fashion store have clothes for everyone and clothes for anyone.

We will jointly assist our Designers, our production of eco-fabrics and our national workforce, making us into conscious consumers.

Never forget that Made in Portugal is Made with Love.

Rute Doellinger – Designer Fashion Designer

Sobre a Rute Doellinger

Olá, sou a Rute Von Doellinger formada em Design de Moda, pela Escola de Moda de Lisboa (Magestil), onde desenvolvi capacidades na Área de Modelagem, Corte, Confeção de Vestuário e Vitrinismo.

Desde criança que me lembro de dizer que queria ser Estilista, mas a culpa foi da minha Mãe, Graça Lopes, uma extraordinária costureira de artigos de couro.